Risk Consultancy

Formal Safety Assessments

Formal Safety Assessments

Marex can carry out the following formal safety assessments as part of the safety case associated documentation or as stand-alone assessments.

  • HAZID Study
    The HAZID study is carried out to ensure that all hazards are comprehensively identified and assessed. HAZID workshops provide a means to involve the workforce directly in the safety case development process.
  • BowTie Analysis
    The BowTie analysis effectively communicates complex risk scenarios in a graphical format that shows the relationships between the causes of unwanted events and their potential escalation to losses and damage. BowTie models show the controls which prevent the top event from occurring in the first place specific to each cause and those recovery controls which are in place to limit the potential outcomes. The BowTie analysis provides a means to involve the workforce directly in the risk analysis and safety case development process. The process helps in identifying deficiencies or opportunities for improvement and will make recommendations for measures required to reduce risk to a level that is as low as reasonably practicable (ALARP).
  • Fire and Explosion Analysis (FEA)
    The FEA analyses the consequences of fire and explosion events on personnel and equipment on the offshore installation using quantitative and qualitative techniques and determines the potential for fire and explosion event escalation to other hazardous consequences. The method identifies and assesses the control measures required to manage the fire and explosion related risks. The process helps in identifying deficiencies or opportunities for improvement and will make recommendations for measures required to reduce risk to a level that is ALARP and provides input data for use in other related FSA studies.
  • Escape, Evacuation and Rescue Analysis (EERA)
    The EERA provides an assessment of the effectiveness of the escape, evacuation and rescue (EER) systems and equipment on the offshore installation that ensure personnel can escape from their work area to a place of safe muster, to evacuate and ultimately be rescued. The process helps in identifying deficiencies or opportunities for improvement and will make recommendations for measures required to reduce risk to a level that is ALARP.
  • Emergency Systems Survivability Analysis (ESSA)
    The ESSA examines SECEs which are in place to reduce the risk to personnel during escape, muster, evacuation and / or rescue from emergencies associated with major accident events. The process identifies the SECEs installed and determines their criticality during emergencies. The ability of the SECE to survive emergency situations associated with major accident events for sufficient time to allow them to complete their designated function, through redundancy or fail-safe functions is assessed. The process helps in identifying deficiencies or opportunities for improvement and will make recommendations for measures required to reduce risk to a level that is ALARP.
  • Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA)
    The objective of the QRA is to quantify the cumulative risk to offshore installation personnel from the major accident hazards identified through the other FSA, in particular, the HAZID study and the BowTie analysis. The frequency of impairment of the temporary refuge can also be quantified. The results can then be reviewed against the client’s tolerability criteria. The process will identify what drives the risk so that hazards can be effectively managed.
  • Human Factors Assessments

    The Marex human factors trained team, including highly experienced certified personnel, perform a range of human factors assessments, including:

    – Safety critical task analyses (SCTAs) – this method could be used to provide a demonstration that the major hazard analysis for the installation has considered people as both a key element in safe operation and as a potential cause of major accidents and their escalation. Hierarchical task analysis (HTA) is used for systematically documenting tasks to provide a basis for risk assessment. Subsequently, Human reliability analysis (HRA) is used to analyse the steps in the task analysis developed using HTA to identify possible human failure modes. The consequences of these errors are then explored, and if these are severe, appropriate error prevention strategies should be developed.

    – Control room analyses – to assess the ergonomics of key control stations of an installation including control room HMI assessments and alarm optimisation assessments. The assessments are carried out against industry standards, guidance and good practice.

    – General human factors assessments – based on UK Health and Safety Executive’s (HSE) guidance ‘Reducing error and influencing behaviour’ (HSG48) to identify and analyse the general impact of human error and behaviour on the workplace health and safety, and how workers’ physical and mental health can be affected by ergonomics and organisational factors.